"Evil will prevail if good people do nothing"

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Long live free Syria

 

Lebanon: Syria’s Charcoal Boys
#syria #lebanon

(Source: youtube.com)

The syrian and Palestinian challenge

#alschallenge

The chemical massacre in #syria, 2013

1 year anniversary of Assad criminal acts in Syria

3rdhokage:

rafou9a:

!! كنا نمزح  مؤلــمة … مدينة داريا بريف دمشق

Hokage.

3rdhokage:

rafou9a:

!! كنا نمزح
مؤلــمة … مدينة داريا بريف دمشق

Hokage.

نكشات l هازا جيشنا
كوميديا عن الجيش الخائن الاسدي السوري

(Source: youtube.com)

Second Chances

A Syrian refugee reflects on the struggle and shame of starting over. An aid worker totally relates.

(Source: tracks.unhcr.org)

Dreams, Interrupted.
As a poet, rapper and university student, Hany saw opportunity everywhere. But the conflict in Syria has put his future in doubt.
“If I am not a student, I am nothing.” Hany’s home is a wooden frame and plastic sheets. Thick carpets line the floor and long cushions serve as sofas. A wood stove offers warmth. A TV connected to satellite brings news from Syria.
He speaks smooth English, mastered from music videos and Dan Brown novels. He is 20 years old, and a refugee. Lost, in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. “I am wasting time here.”
Hany is missing out on his dreams. Knowing this is worse than learning his house was looted and burned, after he fled for his life. It’s worse than knowing his country is bleeding and scarred. He has lost his sense of future.
Before the war, Hany’s was a life taken for granted, lived in the moment. In a quiet district of Homs, in the house his dad built, he would stare at the tree outside his bedroom and write poems.
Hany was a rapper. He performed in a band at school with his friends, and dreamed of university. His future was bright.
Ashraf, his brother, was born on the day Syria’s conflict began. March 15, 2011. His family felt blessed. A new life, in a comfortable home, in a community full of friendship. 20 days later, the violence reached their neighborhood. The bombs fell, and their windows shook.
“For a year and a half we locked ourselves in,” Hany’s mother tells me. “We would squeeze into one room and sleep there, eat there.” When the shelling stopped, they ran, to see the doctor or buy supplies.

CONTINUE READING.

Dreams, Interrupted.

As a poet, rapper and university student, Hany saw opportunity everywhere. But the conflict in Syria has put his future in doubt.

“If I am not a student, I am nothing.” Hany’s home is a wooden frame and plastic sheets. Thick carpets line the floor and long cushions serve as sofas. A wood stove offers warmth. A TV connected to satellite brings news from Syria.

He speaks smooth English, mastered from music videos and Dan Brown novels. He is 20 years old, and a refugee. Lost, in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. “I am wasting time here.”

Hany is missing out on his dreams. Knowing this is worse than learning his house was looted and burned, after he fled for his life. It’s worse than knowing his country is bleeding and scarred. He has lost his sense of future.

Before the war, Hany’s was a life taken for granted, lived in the moment. In a quiet district of Homs, in the house his dad built, he would stare at the tree outside his bedroom and write poems.

Hany was a rapper. He performed in a band at school with his friends, and dreamed of university. His future was bright.

Ashraf, his brother, was born on the day Syria’s conflict began. March 15, 2011. His family felt blessed. A new life, in a comfortable home, in a community full of friendship. 20 days later, the violence reached their neighborhood. The bombs fell, and their windows shook.

“For a year and a half we locked ourselves in,” Hany’s mother tells me. “We would squeeze into one room and sleep there, eat there.” When the shelling stopped, they ran, to see the doctor or buy supplies.

CONTINUE READING.

Photo Essay: Stranded in Sweden by Matilde Gattoni and Matteo Fagotto

Once they were respected and successful, they had money and power. Now they’re broke, roaming like ghosts in a foreign land.

These are the stories of 12 young Syrian men who used to be rich businessmen, global professionals and members of prominent families. They sacrificed everything to escape war and reach Sweden, the only country granting them permanent residence.

Far from discovering the paradise they dreamed about, some now lead an invisible life in bleak suburbs and remote villages, isolated and unable to find work. Cut off from their loved ones, they are stuck in a limbo between a comfortable life they cannot forget and a tough, new reality. Some of the people asked to keep their faces out of the photos, to protect their families still in Syria.

The Project: The National Syrian Project for Prosthetic Limbs 
Our Vision: The project aims to restore amputees’ normal life and make them active members of the society.

Description 
The Syrian national project for artificial limbs is non-profit and non-political independent humanitarian medical charity established in August 2012. The project is the result of a vigorous effort and cooperation between a group of Syrian doctors, some independent and some belong to a prestigious medical bodies such as the Syrian British Medical Society ( SBMS) in the United Kingdom and Syrian Expatriate Medical Association ( SEMA) in France. 
Our goal is to provide complete service to the patient starting from the early stages of psychological support , physical therapy, fitting of prosthesis and gait training to social rehabilitation and helping patients to return to their previous work and be engaged as an active member in the community.
The project is an institute that operate according to its democratic by-laws. The financial support is mainly derived from charities registered in UK (Syria Relief) and France (SEMA). This enables the project to provide its services free of charge to any Syrian amputee in need without any discrimination. 
The project uses a modified Jaipur Foot technique to manufacture the artificial lower limbs. The technique depends mainly on converting low cost drain pipes into a limb skeleton. Feet and articulated knees are then added as needed. Please see links: 
http://sdrv.ms/11D8zPw
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6qU1cUVQIKE
https://www.facebook.com/NSPPL?ref=hl
http://www.nsppl.net/ 
قام مجموعة من الأطباء السوريين بتأسيس المنظمة الوطنية السورية 
لتعويض الأطراف لإقامة مشروع وطني عام و عاجل يقوم بتعويض الأطراف السفلية المبتورة خلال الثورة السورية .
المشروع يهدف لصناعة تعويضات للأطراف السفلية محلياً و بتكلفة رمزية بهدف استيعاب كل المصابين بشكل عاجل 

يشرف على هذا المشروع مجموعة من الأطباء الذين ينتمون لعدة منظمات طبية و إغاثية سورية و هم الجمعية الطبية السورية البريطانية SBMS و الرابطة الطبية للمغتربين السوريين و اتحاد المنظمات الطبية الإغاثية السورية .