"Evil will prevail if good people do nothing"

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Long live free Syria

 

arabarabarab:

Dictators’ Wives

1. Suzanne Mubarak, Egypt

  • Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak’s wife Suzanne has been noted for her fashion sense and was cited as a Clinton family friend. Though she never sought an overtly political role in her husband’s regime, she is most well-known for her fight to improve women’s and children’s rights — for which she has received many awards.

2. Asma Al- Assad

  • The wife of embattled Syrian President Bashir al-Assad, Asma al-Assad spent her childhood in Britain but became First Lady of Syria in 2000. She studied computer science, but eventually went into banking and moved to New York. A recent Vogue profile hailed her as “glamorous, young, and very chic,” and said her central mission is to change the mind-set of six million Syrians under 18, encouraging them to engage in what she calls “active citizenship.”

3. Leila Trabelsi, Tunisia

  • The wife of former Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, Leila Trabelsi is a one-time hairdresser who is widely despised in her country as the ultimate symbol of corruption and excess, reports the Associated Press. Leila and her 10 siblings are said to have operated like a mafia, extorting money from shop owners and demanding a stake in businesses.

4. Safiya Farkash (Gaddafi), Libya

  • Muammar Gaddafi’s second wife is known by her maiden name of Safia Farkash, and is the mother of six of his seven sons and his only daughter. Married to the Libyan leader for 40 years, Farkash (on left) reportedly controls a multi-billion-dollar fortune and massive gold assets, which some authorities fear will be used to prop up her husband’s regime and fund attacks on civilians.  

Ok let me just clear this out.

Basically they’re all khara.

Summary on the massacre that took place in Karm Al Zaytoun in Homs

Via Mulham Al Jundi

quick summery for what happen in #KarmAlZyton #Homs last night 
There are approximately 3000 families that are accounted for
In Al-Adawiya neighborhood, there are houses that continue to burn while people are still inside of them
Only 20% of the residents of Karam al-Zaytoun are still there, and we know nothing of what their situation is like
Karam al-Zaytoun and the neighboring al-Rifai neighborhood used to be the places people fled to
Many women were raped there yesterday, and many women are missing until now
There are houses on Al-Adawi Mosque Road whose residents were shot dead
Civilians are being executed
Their houses were burned while they were still inside of them and after they were doused in gasoline and fuel
Around 45 martyrs have been accounted for so far
and dont forget to take a look at the children who were slaughtered by #Assad regime . #KarmElZytoneh #Homs 3-12-12
https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.202396453199859.36357.100002885184142&type=3

EXTREMELY GRAPHIC! not suitable for weak hearts! 

kids hit by heavy arms in Homs today! only Alah is with us because humanity is failing us! 

جرحى من الأطفل شكر للفيتو الروسي باباعمرو

حسبي الله و نعم الوكيل!!! 

(Source: youtube.com)

مشاهداتي في سوريا د. محمد العريفي 19-2-1433هـ

A friday prayer lecture by Muhamad Al Arifi, telling stories of people he met who ran away from syria, torture, rape and killing stories. 

(Source: youtube.com)

Person of the Year Introduction
History often emerges only in retrospect. Events become significant only when looked back on. No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square in a town barely on a map, he would spark protests that would bring down dictators in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya and rattle regimes in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. Or that that spirit of dissent would spur Mexicans to rise up against the terror of drug cartels, Greeks to march against unaccountable leaders, Americans to occupy public spaces to protest income inequality, and Russians to marshal themselves against a corrupt autocracy.Protests have now occurred in countries whose populations total at least 3 billion people, and the word protest has appeared in newspapers and online exponentially more this past year than at any other time in history.
Is there a global tipping point for frustration? Everywhere, it seems, people said they’d had enough. They dissented; they demanded; they did not despair, even when the answers came back in a cloud of tear gas or a hail of bullets. They literally embodied the idea that individual action can bring collective, colossal change. And although it was understood differently in different places, the idea of democracy was present in every gathering. The root of the word democracy is demos, “the people,” and the meaning of democracy is “the people rule.” And they did, if not at the ballot box, then in the streets. America is a nation conceived in protest, and protest is in some ways the source code for democracy — and evidence of the lack of it.
Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2101745_2102139_2102380,00.html #ixzz1gbClw3EJ

Person of the Year Introduction

History often emerges only in retrospect. Events become significant only when looked back on. No one could have known that when a Tunisian fruit vendor set himself on fire in a public square in a town barely on a map, he would spark protests that would bring down dictators in Tunisia, Egypt and Libya and rattle regimes in Syria, Yemen and Bahrain. Or that that spirit of dissent would spur Mexicans to rise up against the terror of drug cartels, Greeks to march against unaccountable leaders, Americans to occupy public spaces to protest income inequality, and Russians to marshal themselves against a corrupt autocracy.Protests have now occurred in countries whose populations total at least 3 billion people, and the word protest has appeared in newspapers and online exponentially more this past year than at any other time in history.

Is there a global tipping point for frustration? Everywhere, it seems, people said they’d had enough. They dissented; they demanded; they did not despair, even when the answers came back in a cloud of tear gas or a hail of bullets. They literally embodied the idea that individual action can bring collective, colossal change. And although it was understood differently in different places, the idea of democracy was present in every gathering. The root of the word democracy is demos, “the people,” and the meaning of democracy is “the people rule.” And they did, if not at the ballot box, then in the streets. America is a nation conceived in protest, and protest is in some ways the source code for democracy — and evidence of the lack of it.



Read more: http://www.time.com/time/specials/packages/article/0,28804,2101745_2102139_2102380,00.html #ixzz1gbClw3EJ

(Source: nevver)

He who kills his own people is a traitor, played by Orchestra AlMarhala from Tunisia for the Syrian Revolution.

Thank you #Tunisia. #syria

‎”يلي بيقتل شعبو خاين” إهداء إلى ثوار سورية من فرقة أركسترا المرحلة التونسية:

(Source: youtube.com)

 
Huriyat issue 12 is out, download it here to get the latest news about the syrian revolution. http://www.syrian-hurriyat.com/issues/Hurriyat_issue12.pdf

Huriyat issue 12 is out, download it here to get the latest news about the syrian revolution. 
http://www.syrian-hurriyat.com/issues/Hurriyat_issue12.pdf

A massacre found in Al Holeh in one of the factories 

where are all the arab leaders to see this?? who wants to have dialogue with a system that does this to its own people?? 

(Source: youtube.com)

Rulers Street Fighter, hahahha nice animation Arab rulers Vs the people

قتال الشوارع: الحكام العرب vs الشعب 

(Source: youtube.com)

Bedna Horiah l Yahya Hawwa l كليب بدنا حرية - الفنان يحيى حوى (by Yahyahawachannel)