"Evil will prevail if good people do nothing"

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Long live free Syria

 

Why No One Cares About Syria: Barry Andrews at TEDxUCD

(Source: youtube.com)

#سوا منلعن روحه

politechnics:

Bashar al-Assad’s election posters in Syria.
There’s plenty wrong with this picture.

Vote for the son of a bitch bachar al assad

politechnics:

Bashar al-Assad’s election posters in Syria.

There’s plenty wrong with this picture.

Vote for the son of a bitch bachar al assad

lensdimashqi:

المكان : دمشـــق - بـــــرزة
Location : Damascus - Barzeh
الزمان : 18/5/2014
Date : 18/5/2014
. تعليق المصور : فلنتسون ..العصر الحجري
.
#سوريا #دمشق #syria #damascus #Barzeh #برزة http://ift.tt/1oEOS9v

lensdimashqi:

المكان : دمشـــق - بـــــرزة
Location : Damascus - Barzeh
الزمان : 18/5/2014
Date : 18/5/2014
. تعليق المصور : فلنتسون ..العصر الحجري
.
#سوريا #دمشق #syria #damascus #Barzeh #برزة http://ift.tt/1oEOS9v

Second Chances

A Syrian refugee reflects on the struggle and shame of starting over. An aid worker totally relates.

(Source: tracks.unhcr.org)

Dreams, Interrupted.
As a poet, rapper and university student, Hany saw opportunity everywhere. But the conflict in Syria has put his future in doubt.
“If I am not a student, I am nothing.” Hany’s home is a wooden frame and plastic sheets. Thick carpets line the floor and long cushions serve as sofas. A wood stove offers warmth. A TV connected to satellite brings news from Syria.
He speaks smooth English, mastered from music videos and Dan Brown novels. He is 20 years old, and a refugee. Lost, in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. “I am wasting time here.”
Hany is missing out on his dreams. Knowing this is worse than learning his house was looted and burned, after he fled for his life. It’s worse than knowing his country is bleeding and scarred. He has lost his sense of future.
Before the war, Hany’s was a life taken for granted, lived in the moment. In a quiet district of Homs, in the house his dad built, he would stare at the tree outside his bedroom and write poems.
Hany was a rapper. He performed in a band at school with his friends, and dreamed of university. His future was bright.
Ashraf, his brother, was born on the day Syria’s conflict began. March 15, 2011. His family felt blessed. A new life, in a comfortable home, in a community full of friendship. 20 days later, the violence reached their neighborhood. The bombs fell, and their windows shook.
“For a year and a half we locked ourselves in,” Hany’s mother tells me. “We would squeeze into one room and sleep there, eat there.” When the shelling stopped, they ran, to see the doctor or buy supplies.

CONTINUE READING.

Dreams, Interrupted.

As a poet, rapper and university student, Hany saw opportunity everywhere. But the conflict in Syria has put his future in doubt.

“If I am not a student, I am nothing.” Hany’s home is a wooden frame and plastic sheets. Thick carpets line the floor and long cushions serve as sofas. A wood stove offers warmth. A TV connected to satellite brings news from Syria.

He speaks smooth English, mastered from music videos and Dan Brown novels. He is 20 years old, and a refugee. Lost, in Lebanon’s Bekaa Valley. “I am wasting time here.”

Hany is missing out on his dreams. Knowing this is worse than learning his house was looted and burned, after he fled for his life. It’s worse than knowing his country is bleeding and scarred. He has lost his sense of future.

Before the war, Hany’s was a life taken for granted, lived in the moment. In a quiet district of Homs, in the house his dad built, he would stare at the tree outside his bedroom and write poems.

Hany was a rapper. He performed in a band at school with his friends, and dreamed of university. His future was bright.

Ashraf, his brother, was born on the day Syria’s conflict began. March 15, 2011. His family felt blessed. A new life, in a comfortable home, in a community full of friendship. 20 days later, the violence reached their neighborhood. The bombs fell, and their windows shook.

“For a year and a half we locked ourselves in,” Hany’s mother tells me. “We would squeeze into one room and sleep there, eat there.” When the shelling stopped, they ran, to see the doctor or buy supplies.

CONTINUE READING.

France: Syria used chemical arms 14 times since October

syrianfreedomls:

Washington, May 13, 2014 by AFP

The Syrian regime is believed to have used chemical weapons including chlorine in 14 attacks since late 2013, French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius said Tuesday.

Fabius, who is on an official visit to Washington, also voiced France’s regrets that US President…

newyorker:

Late last year, Nina Berman and three other photographers from the NOOR agency travelled to Jordan to set up a photo booth in the middle of the Za’atari refugee camp. To counter the frightening impression of the camp’s entrance, they made outdoor prints of the portraits, some as large as three metres wide: http://nyr.kr/1j1RxIp

Top: Four-day-old triplets in their family’s rented caravan. Their mother, Zainab, left her village in rural Syria seven months ago. Photograph by Alixandra Fazzina.
Bottom: Photographs inside the main camp.

Photo Booth in Za’atari : The New Yorker

Photo Booth in Za’atari : The New Yorker

Iranian Commander Lets Slip That Revolutionary Guard Is Fighting in Syria

syrianfreedomls:

Hossein Hamedani Iran SyriaHead of the Mohammad Rasulallah Revolutionary guard base, Hossein Hamedani, attends a conference to mark the martyrs of terrorism in Tehran on Sept. 6, 2011.Morteza Nikoubaz—Reuters

May 7, 2014 by Karl Vick

It’s common knowledge that Iran sent forces into Syria early in the civil war….